Category Archives: File 1099

Debunking Tax Myths About IRS Audits

Few Americans actually enjoy doing their taxes. It’s why so many taxpayers tend to wait until the last possible second to file. Then there’s the fear of the Internal Revenue Service. Unfortunately, the IRS is often portrayed as “out to get us.” Nobody wants to be audited. With that in mind, here are myths about IRS audits that you shouldn’t believe, as referenced from Money.com.

  1. You’re more likely to be audited if you e-file – Thanks to innovative software, gone are the days when you had to spend days (or even weeks) filing your taxes. The fact is that nearly 90 percent of all returns today are submitted electronically. Plus, the IRS confirms that returns done by hand are 20 times more likely to have mistakes on them compared to ones completed online. This means you shouldn’t have to fret over taking the convenient route this tax season.

  2. IRS agents will come to your home – Mistakes occasionally happen when filing online. For whatever reason, things just don’t match up accordingly. As a result, an agent is required to conduct an audit if for no other reason than to get a few items clarified. So should you have to be concerned about an intimidating IRS agent knocking on your door at dinner time? The short answer is ‘no.’ Nearly 70 percent of audits take place by mail. Be aware that scammers are trying to take advantage of taxpayers via email or phone more so than ever before.

  3. Filing late raises the risk of being audited – Do you consider yourself a procrastinator with taxes? Some taxpayers mistakenly think that using an extension to file late increases their chance of getting audited. This just isn’t accurate, though. There are certainly a number of factors that warrant an extra look by the IRS. But the timeframe in which you filed isn’t necessarily one of them.

  4. Audits are a terrible experience – It used to be that the IRS was a frightening agency that took over your house and went through every record imaginable. You can feel comfortable knowing that isn’t the case anymore. Agents are required to focus more on taxpayer rights and customer service. Ultimately, you’re working with the IRS agent to resolve something on your return.

  5. Only the wealthy get audited – There’s no question that the rich have a higher chance of being audited by the IRS. Those who make less than $200,000 in a year get audited 1 percent of the time. Not surprisingly, the more income you report, the greater the chance of being audited. However, just because you may not make six figures doesn’t mean the IRS won’t take a closer look. For example, families earning less than $100,000 a year saw their audit risk go up by 17 percent in the last seven years. Meanwhile, Americans making more than $100,000 per year have seen their audit risk decrease by 8 percent.

  6. More deductions mean more audits – There are plenty of deductions for taxpayers to take advantage of over the course of a year. It’s not as though a long list of deductions will raise a red flag with the IRS. Now, if charitable deductions amount to more than your income, you’re going to be in some trouble.

  7. The audit risk is over after you get your refund – You waited months to get that refund check and it finally arrives. No longer do you have to worry about audited, right? Not exactly. It’s important to know that the IRS can go back up to three years to audit someone, or up to six years if they find a major discrepancy.

File 1099 Forms With Ease

Now that you have clarification on some of the common tax filing myths, it’s time to get to work. OnlineFileTaxes.com is the easiest, most cost-effective way to file 1099 online. Thanks to OnlineFileTaxes.com, 1099 preparation is a breeze. Whether you just need one copy of 1099 forms or hundreds, we are your one-stop shop.

Whether you’re a business owner, CPA, accounting professional, or individual and need to e-file 1099 forms, turn to OnlineFileTaxes.com. Our prices start at just $1.25 per form, including printing, mailing, and e-filing services.

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Tips for Filing 1099-R

Form 1099-R is a U.S. Internal Revenue Service form that’s used to report distributions from pensions, annuities, retirement/profit-sharing plans, IRAs, and insurance contractors for each person to whom you have made a designated distribution or are treated as having made a distribution of $10 or more from profit-sharing or retirement plans. This could also include any individual arrangements, annuities, pensions, insurance contractors, survivor income benefit plans, permanent and total disability payments under life insurance contractors, charitable gift annuities, etc. Keep reading for 1099-R filing tips from OnlineFileTaxes.com.

  1. Your taxable amount may not be fully ‘taxable-focus’ on Box 2a - Usually, your plan administrator must reflect the taxable amount of your distribution in Box 2a. Be aware that the following are non-taxable transactions, which would be reported in Box 1, but not Box 2a:

    1. Direct rollovers between qualified plans, 403(b) plans, 457(b) plans, traditional IRAs, and simple IRAs
    2. The principal on a return of excess contribution from an IRA that’s removed by the deadline (the excess amount and earnings are reported in Box 1, but only the earnings are reported in Box 2a)
    3. Any recharacterized IRA contributions or Roth conversions
    4. Distributions of after-tax amounts from qualified plan
  2. You will need to apply the non-taxable treatment on your return if an amount is reported in Box 2a – Let’s look at an example of this. You receive a rollover eligible distribution and you rolled over the amount within two months. The IRS requires that you report such amount on Lines 15a and 15b if the distribution was made from an IRA or Lines 16a and 16b if the distribution was made from a qualified savings plan. Maybe you receive a distribution of $15,000 from your traditional IRA last year, but you rolled over the amount within the allocated 60 days. The issuer of your 1099-R must report the amount as taxable. When you file your return, be sure to do the following:

    1. Enter $15,000 on Line 15a

    2. Enter ‘rollover’ next to Line 15b

    3. Enter ‘0’ on Line 15b

  3. Non-taxable amounts are attributed to after-tax contributions made to your qualified plan – Here’s the thing: If the distributions were made from a qualified plan or 403(b) plan, then there’s a good chance the 1099-R correctly shows the non-taxable amount. Just know that you may have to file Form 8606 with your return in this case. Form 8606 includes a formula that helps you determine the taxable portion of your distribution. Filing this additional form will help the IRS understand how you got to the current figure.

  4. Stay accurate with any recharacterization – Let’s say that you converted an amount that water recharacterized down the road. If a conversion for last year is recharacterized this year, the 1099-R for recharacterization will not be issued until January of next year. Not only that, but the tax reporting for the recharacterization will likely not correspond to the tax reporting for the conversion. Consider the hypothetical in which you converted $200,000 last year and, due to market losses, the account was valued at $150,000 when it was recharacterized. You should expect to receive a 1099-R form and a 5498 showing $150,000 for the recharacterization. Still, you would treat the entire $200,000 as non-taxable because the entire amount was recharacterized for tax purposes. In the event that you characterize less than 100 percent of the conversion, you will need to file IRS Form 8606.

Unless the form shows that you had taxes withheld, it’s not required that a 1099-R be filed with your return. It’s a good idea, however, to keep a copy of your account statement that includes the transaction for which the form was generated. This way, you have what you need should a transaction review come up down the road.

Stress-Free Way to File 1099 Forms

We are proud to make 1099 preparation much more efficient and cost-effective than it’s been in the past. OnlineFileTaxes.com is an IRS-approved e-file provider. Whether you need just one copy of 1099 forms or hundreds, we can help. Our 1099 online forms are available for as low as $1.25 perform.

 

Here’s how it works: First, use our online tax reporting service to e-file your 1099 forms in minutes. No longer are you forced to spend hours on end filling out forms manually. From there, your online files are electronically sent to the IRS for fast, efficient, and simple filing. We even print and mail recipient copies for you to keep for your records.

With OnlineFileTaxes.com, you don’t have to invest in expensive software that you only use during tax season. Plus, say goodbye to outrageous administrative and IT costs related to year-end 1099 processing.

Have you been searching for a less stressful way to e-file 1099 forms? Look no further than OnlineFileTaxes.com.

 

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Tips for Filing 1099-DIV

You have plenty of tasks on your to-do list as a business owner. From paying employees to keeping customers happy, you will do whatever is necessary to keep things running smoothly. When it comes to taxes, though, you may be anything but an expert. Let’s say you rely on independent contractors for certain projects. If that’s the case, you must send out 1099 forms for tax-filing purposes. Be aware that such forms are only sent to sole proprietorships and partnerships. Most importantly, it’s your responsibility to do your own bookkeeping. Tax season will be here before we know it, which is why it’s imperative to get those forms straightened out now. Keep reading for 1099-DIV filing tips.

About Form 1099-DIV

Form 1099 Dividends and Distributions is used to report dividends and other distributions payments to investors. What’s a dividend, you may ask? Well, dividends reported on 1099-DIV forms can include dividends paid, capital gains, dividends, and exempt-interest dividends. Form 1099-DIV reports the total amount paid by the bank or financial institution to an investor during the course of a year. The form is also used to report tax items such as Section 1250 Gain, Section 1202 Gain, investment expenses, foreign tax paid, as well as federal tax withheld.

Keep in mind that financial institutions must file this form with the IRS for each investor to whom they have paid dividends during the year, whether electronically or on paper. The bank is also required to provide a statement to the recipient to whom the dividend is paid. In terms of logistics, 1099-DIV forms will be reported on Schedule B of your personal return. Should the form be issued to a partnership or S corporation, it will be listed separately on the Schedule K-1 and end up on your personal Schedule B.

Who Should File Form 1099-DIV?

The IRS requires most payments of dividends and distributions to be reported on 1099-DIV forms by the person or entity that makes the payments. As aforementioned, most financial institutions or government agencies making dividend payments are the ones needing this form.

When is Form 1099-DIV Filed?

An organization must file this form if they:

  • Paid dividends (including capital gain dividends and exempt-interest dividends) and other distributions on stocks of $10 or more

  • Paid at least $600 as part of a liquidation

  • Paid or withheld any foreign tax on dividends and other distributions on stock

  • Withheld any federal income tax on dividends under the backup withholding rules

Are There Penalties For Not Filing Form 1099-DIV?

If you weren’t already aware, the deadline to file 1099-DIV forms is the end of February if filing on paper. Electronic files must be submitted by the end of March. That said, the deadline to provide recipient copies is the end of January. It’s important to know that the IRS imposes heavy penalties if a business fails to file in general or fails to file correct information with these forms. For example, expect to get penalized for not providing recipient copies. Not surprisingly, the penalty increases with time. That’s why it’s a good idea to file as soon as possible.

File 1099 Forms With Ease

There’s no question that filing your 1099 forms can become a nightmare. Do you really want to spend your time manually completing forms and/or purchasing expensive software to get the job done? Our team at OnlineFileTaxes.com doesn’t think you should. Thanks to our online tax reporting service, you can e-file your 1099 forms online in minutes. Whether you have one or hundreds or 1099 forms, we invite you to check out our services. Note that standard pricing includes printing, mailing, and filing services.

Why Use OnlineFileTaxes.Com?

Are you tired of managing those 1099 tax forms the old-fashioned way? Has it gotten to the point where tax forms get in the way of running your business? Then you’ve got to check out what our e-file provider has to offer. Rest assured that our service is simple, cost-effective, efficient, and secure. As long as you get your data in by the end of March, then it will be filed on time. OnlineFileTaxes.com is also an IRS-approved federal e-filing provider.

Here are just some of the benefits of working with OnlineFileTaxes.com:

  • Allows you to process any number of forms seamlessly and economically

  • Eliminates the need to invest in any software

  • Eliminates administrative and IT costs associated with year-end 1099 processing

  • Prints, mails, and electronically files with the IRS once you fill out the required forms

  • Supports uploading Excel files instead of manually filling out forms

With OnlineFileTaxes.com, forms cost as low as $1.25. We are proud to offer the most cost-efficient way to e-file 1099 forms. Don’t let 1099 preparation get in the way of running your business any longer. Sign up for free at OnlineFileTaxes.com.

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